New Employment Eligibility Verification, Form I-9

U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) has annouced the release of a new version of the Employment Eligibility Verification, Form I-9, which is used to verify the identity and employment authorization of individuals hired to work in the United States. Employers and Human Resources staff may begin using this new Form I-9 or continue to use the current version of the Form I-9 (dated 11/14/16 N) through September 17, 2017.  Beginning September 18, 2017, employers must use the new form.  

The revised form includes some cosmetic changes, along with changes related to acceptable I-9 verification documentation, including Consular Reports of Birth Abroad.  USCIS plans to update its M-274 “Handbook for Employers: Guidance for Completing Form I-9” in the near future.

This change, in addition to the recent increase in penalties for employment verification errors, are of significant importance to employers and Human Resources departments, as all U.S. employers must ensure proper completion of Form I-9 for each individual they hire.  More importantly, as the workforce compliance landscape continues to evolve, employers should take this opportunity to evaluate their current I-9 policies and procedures to ensure they are in compliance with the latest I-9 and E-Verify rules.  As part of this process, employers should:

  • Review current I-9 policies and practices with qualified counsel.  This includes careful analysis of all workforce compliance practices to mitigate errors and mistakes on the form;
  • Develop formal I-9 and E-Verify protocols for detecting, preventing, and improving against I-9 violations;
  • Mitigate historical I-9s with qualified counsel to help avoid against fines and penalties for certain technical or procedural errors on the forms;
  • Develop, implement, and maintain compliance policies for worksite raids.

For any questions on employment eligibility or workforce compliance issues, please feel free to contact us.

Demand For H-1B Visas This Year May Exceed 300,000

Starting April 3, 2017, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will begin accepting H-1B petitions for Fiscal Year 2018 (FY2018).  As in years past, if USCIS receives more than the available 85,000 H-1B visas in the first few days of April, they will use a computer-generated random lottery to select the petitions they will process.  Based on the number of petitions received in the first few days of last year (over 236,000) and the market demand for high-skilled labor, our office anticipates USCIS receiving over 300,000 H-1B petitions in the first few days of April. 

Accordingly, time is running out for employers to timely prepare their H-1B petitions for submission on April 3rd.  Generally, it takes at least 10-14 days to prepare and file an H-1B petition, due to the prerequisite filing requirements of the Labor Condition Application (LCA), which takes up to 7 business days to certify.  Therefore, if you are responsible for your businesses' immigration planning and processing and you have already identified your H-1B candidates, please initiate the H-1B visa process in the next two weeks to ensure it is timely filed.  

DOL Outlining Review of PERM Labor Certification Program

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has announced its plans to initiate a review of its PERM Labor Certification Program, in accordance with President Obama's recent Executive Action announcement to reform the U.S. immigration system.  As part of its review, DOL will seek input from the public on how its current regulations can be modernized to be more responsive to changes in the U.S. labor force.  DOL will be seeking input in the following areas:

  1. Options for identifying labor shortages and surpluses and methods for aligning domestic worker recruitment requirements to those shortages and surpluses.

  2. Methods and practices to modernize U.S. worker requirements.

  3. Processes to clarify employer obligations to ensure PERM positions are open to U.S. workers.

  4. Ranges of case processing timeframes and possibilities of introducing a premium processing program.

  5. Application submission and review process and feasibility for efficiently addressing nonmaterial errors.