A Guide For Winning The H-1B Visa Lottery

Starting April 1, 2019, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will begin accepting this year’s H-1B visa petitions. As in years past, if USCIS receives more than the available 85,000 H-1B visas in the first few days of April, they will use a computer-generated random lottery to select the petitions they will process.  Even though the H-1B lottery selection process will change this year, based on the number of petitions received in the first few days of April last year (over 190,000) and the previous year (over 199,000), combined with the current market demand for high-skilled labor and reports of possible changes to visa programs in the future, many our anticipating that USCIS will receive over 200,000 H-1B petitions in the first few days of this April. 

Accordingly, time is running out for employers to timely prepare their H-1B petitions for submission to play in this H-1B lottery on April 1st. Generally, it takes at least 10-14 days to prepare and file an H-1B petition, due to the prerequisite filing requirements of the Labor Condition Application (LCA), which takes up to 7 business days to certify. Therefore, if you are responsible for your businesses' immigration planning and processing and you have already identified your H-1B candidates, please initiate the H-1B visa process in the next two weeks to ensure it is timely filed. 

In spite of recent reports of proposed changes to the H-1B work visa program by the Trump administration, the H-1B filing process and procedures will remain largely the same as it has in previous years. Nevertheless, as indicated by the massive increase of Requests for Evidence (RFE) and denials of H-1B petitions issued by USCIS over the past year, employers and foreign nationals should be prepared to evidence the following, in order to increase their chances of getting their visa petitions approved:

  1. Document the specific scope and educational requirements for the position to show that the position is one which requires a Bachelor’s degree as a minimum to enter the occupation.

  2. Review the prevailing wage rates for the occupation through the Department of Labor’s Wage Surveys to determine whether the wage level is appropriate for the professional position you are hiring for.

  3. Document the nexus between the foreign national’s degree and the occupation they will be hired for.

Needless to say, the H-1B visa petition can be a technical and cumbersome application to file.  Working with qualified counsel will help to ensure technical mistakes are avoided and that a comprehensive petition will have the best chance at winning in the H-1B visa lottery.  If you have any questions about the H-1B visa process, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

H-1B Visa Lottery Changes & The Return of Premium Processing

In follow up to last month’s announcement of proposed changes to the H-1B visa selection process by U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS), the Department of Homeland Security has finalized its rule reversing the order in which USCIS will select H-1B cap-subject petitions in the H-1B visa lottery. 

While the H-1B cap will remain at 85,000, this new regulation will reverse the lottery order in which USCIS selects H-1B petitions for adjudication, in order to increase the amount of H-1B visas awarded to foreign nationals with U.S. master’s degrees and higher.  Under the previous lottery system, USCIS would first conduct a lottery for 20,000 H-1B visas for individuals with a U.S. master’s degrees and higher (the “advanced degree cap”), and then those individuals with advanced degrees who were not selected in that lottery were added to the pool of 65,000 H-1B visas (the “regular cap”), for another chance to be selected with individuals who only have a bachelor’s degree.  In accordance with this new rule, USCIS will now conduct the regular cap lottery first and include all advanced degree holders.  Those with advanced degrees not selected in the“regular cap” will thereafter be placed in a second lottery (the “advanced degree cap”), if there are enough advanced degree holders to meet the advanced-degree lottery.

In accordance with the Trump administration’s previous announcements for employment-immigration reforms, USCIS believes this change to the lottery system will increase the chances of H-1B visas being awarded to individuals with U.S. master’s degrees and higher.   

While USCIS announced that this change to the H-1B visa selection process will be implemented for this year’s H-1B visa lottery, USCIS will be postponing its proposed mandatory online registration for U.S. employer’s filing H-1B petitions.  As such, employers and foreign nationals should be preparing their H-1B visa petitions NOW (as they have done in previous years) in order to timely have those petitions filed on April 1st.

Additionally, USCIS announced this week they have resumed “premium processing” for all H-1B visa petitions that remain pending from the April 2018 lottery.  USCIS had temporarily suspended premium processing for most H-1B petitions last year, but has removed the suspension, as of now, for only H-1B visa petitions that remain pending from the April 2018 lottery.  While premium processing is still currently unavailable for H-1B transfers, amendments, and extensions with different employers, we may see premium processing for these cases resume around February 19th.

Employers seeking to hire foreign national employees this year should assess their upcoming workforce needs and identify those who will require H-1B visa sponsorship NOW. These individuals may include:

·       New graduating foreign students in the U.S.

·       Overseas individuals seeking to start work in the U.S.

·       Foreign individuals in the U.S. already working under a different nonimmigrant status for a different employer and are seeking to change jobs

Failure to file your H-1B petition on April 1st may jeopardize your chance at securing an H-1B visa for your employee. After the 2019 H-1B visas are gone, employers will have to wait until April 1, 2020 to file H-1B petitions again, and foreign employees may lose their lawful status and authorization to work. The clock is ticking…don't delay!

If you have any questions about the H-1B visa process, contact me.

Temporary Suspension & Increased Costs for "Premium Processing"​ of Visas

U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) has announced two major changes to their "premium processing" programs, which allows employers and foreign nationals to pay an optional USCIS filing fee to guarantee a response on their petition within 15 days.  The first announcement is an increase in the premium processing fee.  Beginning October 1, 2018 the premium processing fee will increase from $1,225 to $1,410.  

USCIS' second announcement is an extension of their ongoing suspension of “premium processing” for most H-1B visa petitions until February 19, 2019.  USCIS had previously announced that they were temporarily suspending premium processing for new, cap-subject H-1B visa petitions until September 10, 2018.  This new announcement, however, extends the previously annouced temporary suspension through February 19, 2019.  Additionally, beginning September 11, 2019, USCIS will also stop accepting premium processing for any H-1B petition seeking new employment, transfer (i.e. “change of employer”), or amendment which are filed with either the Vermont or California Service Centers until February 19, 2019.

USCIS will, however, continue to accept premium processing for H-1B petitions filed at the Nebraska Service Center by an employer requesting a “continuation of previously approved employment without change with the same employer,” and premium processing for H-1B cap-exempt petitions (such as university, nonprofit research institutions, government research organizations) which are filed only with the California Service Center.

While this temporary suspension of premium processing now impacts most H-1B petitions, it does not affect premium processing for other nonimmigrant visa petitions (including L-1, O-1, TN, and others).  Additionally, USCIS will continue to accept premium processing for H-1B petitions filed prior to September 11, 2018 (when the suspension goes into effect).

This announcement is likely to have a major impact on U.S. employers, international students, and most immigrants seeking U.S. work visas.  First, this news likely means that USCIS processing times for all USCIS filings may increase, causing delays in visa issuance.  Even though, in cases of an H-1B transfer, an H-1B employee can begin working with a new employer upon the filing of the transfer with USCIS, many H-1B employees prefer to wait until they actually receive their H-1B transfer approval notice from USCIS before starting employment with a new employer.  As a result, this may cause delays for employers seeking to onboard new employees.

Additionally, international students currently availing H-1B “cap gap” extensions of their OPT and still awaiting USCIS approval of their cap-subject H-1B petition will need to be mindful of their authorized stay in light of USCIS’ recent unlawful presence memorandum for foreign students.  

In light of this news, H-1B employers and foreign nationals seeking to file any H-1B petitions should plan accordingly.  For assistance in preparing for these or delays, please feel free to contact us.

New Immigration Policy to Deny Cases Without Issuing RFE or NOID

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has released a new policy that gives immigration adjudicators discretion to deny any and all visa applications or petitions without first issuing a Request for Evidence (RFE) or Notice of Intent to Deny (NOID) in cases where initial evidence is missing or does not establish eligibility. This new guidance, which becomes effective September 11, 2018, replaces a prior policy which instructed adjudicators to request additional evidence in a case, unless there was no possible way that additional evidence could fix a deficiency in the case.

The intent of this guidance is to provide immigration officers with more discretion to deny a visa application without requesting further information first. This policy has even greater implications in light of USCIS’ other recent announcement instructing officers to initiate removal (deportation) proceedings if, upon denial of an application or petition an individual is unlawfully present in the United States. 

As USCIS continues to shift away from a focus on immigration benefits to a focus on immigration enforcement and stricter standards for approval of visa petitions, employers and foreign nationals should consider the following strategies to avoid consequences imposed by these new rules:

  • Take all precautions to ensure visa petitions and applications are filed with the requisite documentation and evidence. This includes overdocumenting how the employer and employee meet all of the visa eligibility requirements.
  • Applications to extend nonimmigrant visa status (including H-1B, L-1, O-1, and others) should be filed as early as possible (up to 6 months before expiration) to avoid any lapses in nonimmigrant status.
  • Employer’s should continue to extend the nonimmigrant status of their foreign national employees until their applications for lawful permanent residence are approved, in order to avoid situations where the employee is in unlawful presence and could be deported.
  • Employer’s should consider utilizing USCIS’s “premium processing” program when filing “change of employer” visa petitions to quickly obtain work authorization for a candidate and not have a candidate risk changing employers without an approval.

These new USCIS policies reinforce the importance of ensuring all visa petitions and applications include the required evidence to show the applicant meets the visa eligibility requirements. The chances of having a family or employment-based visa petition or application denied are significantly reduced when working with qualified immigration counsel to prepare a comprehensive application.

For more information or advice on how to navigate these or any other immigration policy changes, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

USCIS Policy Change Regarding Deportation Proceedings for Visa Applicants

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has announced a sweeping new policy, effective immediately, that instructs USCIS officers to initiate removal (deportation) proceedings if, upon denial of an application or petition, an individual is unlawfully present in the United States. This new policy requires USCIS to issue a Notice to Appear (NTA) – a document issued to a foreign national instructing them to appear before an immigration judge for removal proceedings – in the following circumstances:

  • Where fraud or misrepresentation are substantiated or where an applicant abused any program related to the receipt of public benefits;
  • Criminal cases where an applicant is convicted of or charged with a criminal offense, or has committed acts that are chargeable as a criminal offense, even if the criminal conduct was not the basis for the denial or the ground of removability;
  • Where USCIS denies an Application for Naturalization on good moral character grounds because of a criminal offense;
  • Upon the denial of an application or petition, when an applicant is unlawfully present in the U.S.

This new policy is expected to dramatically impact a wide range of foreign workers, students, and U.S. employers. While historically NTAs have rarely been issued to employment-based visa applicant’s after the denial of an application, this policy shift appears to fall in line with President Trump’s executive orders focused on immigration enforcement and prosecution

Examples of employer-sponsored foreign nationals who may now be subject to removal proceedings include:

  • Individuals who have their application to extend or change to H-1B, L-1, or other nonimmigrant visa status denied, and whose visa status has expired while waiting for USCIS to adjudicate their application.
  • Individuals who have their application to change employers denied, and whose visa status has expired while waiting for USCIS to adjudicate their application.
  • Students who have their applications to extend their F-1 status or applications to change status to H-1B denied, and who have now fallen out of status under their student visa.
  • Individuals who have their application for either employment-based or family-based adjustment of status to permanent residence denied, and who now no longer have any nonimmigrant status.

While it is not clear how USCIS will implement these new guidelines, this change will nevertheless likely affect the lives of many individuals who have lived and worked in the U.S. lawfully for years. Foreign nationals that receive an NTA are advised to speak to qualified counsel to handle this sensitive matter. For questions on this or any immigration matter, please feel free to contact me.

Immigration Policy Changes for Foreign Students & Exchange Visitors

U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) has recently issued two updates that may have major consequences for foreign students and exchange visitors.

Most recently, USCIS issued a policy memorandum which changes the way USCIS will interpret and calculate unlawful presence for F-1 and J-1 visa holders (including their dependents).  Generally, a foreign national who remains in the U.S. beyond the expiration date of their I-94 Arrival/Departure Record begins to accrue unlawful presence, and in certain circumstances, may be subject to a 3-year or 10-year bar to re-admission to the United States.  Under the previous policy, however, foreign national students and exchange visitors who are granted duration of status (D/S) would not begin to accrue unlawful presence until either USCIS made a formal determination that a status violation had occurred or an immigration judge ordered a foreign national deported.

Under the new policy, starting August 9, 2018, F-1 and J-1 visa holders will begin to accrue unlawful presence on the earliest of the following:

  • The day after the student/exchange visitor no longer pursues the course of study or authorized activity, or the day after the person engages in unauthorized activity
  • The day after the grace period, after completing the course of study, program, or practical training (OPT/CPT)
  • The day after the person’s Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record expires;
  • The day after an Immigration Judge orders the person deported or removed.

Simply put, this new policy, will have a dramatic impact on F-1 and J-1 nonimmigrants who are not vigilant with respect to maintaining valid status and/or are engaging in “unauthorized activity.”  

Additionally, last month, USCIS updated its website regarding STEM OPT extensions , which allow F-1 STEM gradates to obtain an additional 24 months of Optional Practical Training (OPT) work authorization to work for employers that participate in the E-Verify program.  The new USCIS guidance no longer permits students to engage in STEM OPT at third party worksite locations (even if the employer maintains the requisite employer-employee relationship with the STEM worker).

This new guidance changes previous policy which only required the student be a bona fide employee of the employer signing the I-983 training plan.  Now, any employees performing duties at sites not controlled by the E-Verify employer could risk being in violation of their status.

These updates are very nuanced and complex, especially when it comes to when and whether someone is in violation of their status or engaged in unauthorized activities.  As always, if you have questions on these issues or how to maintain status, please don’t hesitate to contact me

USCIS Will Temporarily Suspend Premium Processing for New H-1B Petitions

U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) has once again announced that starting April 2nd, 2018 premium processing for new, cap-subject H-1B visa petitions will be temporarily suspended.  With premium processing, employers can pay an optional USCIS filing fee to guarantee a response on their petition within 15 days.  This temporary suspension is expected to last until September 10, 2018. While H-1B premium processing is suspended, petitioners will not be able request premium processing for new, cap-subject H-1B visa cases.

This suspension of premium processing (similar to the one last year) applies only to new H-1B petitions filed, generally, by for-profit companies that are subject to the 85,000 annual H-1B visa cap. Meaning, this will apply to ALL petitions filed for the FY19 H-1B regular cap and master’s advanced degree cap exemption (the “master’s cap”) and any of these petitions filed with a request for premium processing will be rejected.

The premium processing suspension will NOT, however, apply to petitions that may be cap-exempt (i.e. H-1B workers who will work for or at a university or affiliated nonprofit or research institute), nor will it apply to H-1B extension or change of employer petitions. This temporary suspension of premium processing does NOT apply to other eligible nonimmigrant classifications filed on Form I-129, either.

Even though premium processing is temporarily suspended, employers may still submit a request to expedite an H-1B petition if they meet the criteria on the Expedite Criteria webpage.  The reason for the temporary suspension will allow USCIS to reduce overall H-1B processing times. 

If you have further questions on the H-1B visa process, please feel free to contact me.

Winning The H-1B Visa Lottery

Starting April 2, 2018, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will begin accepting H-1B petitions for Fiscal Year 2019. As in years past, if USCIS receives more than the available 85,000 H-1B visas in the first few days of April, they will use a computer-generated random lottery to select the petitions they will process. Based on the number of petitions received in the first few days of April last year (over 199,000) and the previous year (over 236,000), combined with the current market demand for high-skilled labor and reports of possible changes to visa programs in the future, many our anticipating that USCIS will receive over 200,000 H-1B petitions in the first few days of this April. 

Accordingly, time is running out for employers to timely prepare their H-1B petitions for submission to play in this H-1B lottery on April 2nd. Generally, it takes at least 10-14 days to prepare and file an H-1B petition, due to the prerequisite filing requirements of the Labor Condition Application (LCA), which takes up to 7 business days to certify. Therefore, if you are responsible for your businesses' immigration planning and processing and you have already identified your H-1B candidates, please initiate the H-1B visa process in the next two weeks to ensure it is timely filed. 

In light of recent reports of proposed changes to the H-1B work visa program by the Trump administration, USCIS has confirmed that it intends for the H-1B filing process and procedures to remain the same as it has in previous years.  Nevertheless, as indicated by the massive increase of Requests for Evidence (RFE) and denials of H-1B petitions issued by USCIS over the past year, employers and foreign nationals should be prepared to evidence the following, in order to increase their chances of getting their visa petitions approved:

  1. Document the specific scope and educational requirements for the position to show that the position is one which requires a Bachelor’s degree as a minimum to enter the occupation.
  2. Review the prevailing wage rates for the occupation through the Department of Labor’s Wage Surveys to determine whether the wage level is appropriate for the professional position you are hiring for.
  3. Document the nexus between the foreign national’s degree and the occupation they will be hired for.

WATCH my conversation on how to overcome issues with H-1B RFEs

Needless to say, the H-1B visa petition can be a technical and cumbersome application to file.  Working with qualified counsel will help to ensure technical mistakes are avoided and that a comprehensive petition will have the best chance at winning in the H-1B visa lottery.  If you have any questions about the H-1B visa process, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Potential Changes to High-Skilled Immigration Programs in 2018

The Trump administration’s future immigration intentions were recently announced in their semi-annual Unified Agenda. The Unified Agenda lists possible regulations under development by federal agencies for the coming year. The announcement indicates the administration’s plans to undo Obama administration immigration benefits and impose tighter restrictions on nonimmigrant visa categories, such as the H-1B, H-4, and Optional Practical Training (OPT) for F-1 students.

The agenda specifies the administration’s intent to make the following policy changes in connection with Trump’s “Buy American, Hire American” executive order:

  • H-1B Eligibility: Redefining what a “speciality occupation” is for H-1B visa purposes to “increase the focus on truly obtaining the best and brightest.” The proposal would also “revise the definition of employment and employer-employee relationship to better protect U.S. workers and wages.” This includes “additional requirements to ensure employers pay appropriate wages to H-1B visa holders.” The rule would also impose additional restrictions on H-1B dependent employers that rely on large H-1B workforces and those employers who have H-1B employees working off-site.
  • H-1B Lottery: Revising the H-1B visa lottery system to establish an electronic pre-registration program for cap-subject H-1B applicants, and tweaking the electronic lottery selection process to award visas to the “most skilled or highest-paid petition beneficiaries.”  
  • H-4 Work Authorization: Elimination of the regulation that allow H-4 visa holders (spouses of H-1B visa holders) to apply for work authorization. The Trump administration has previously indicated its intent to remove this Obama rule which has provided work permits to thousands of H-4 spouses.
  • OPT for F-1 Students: Reforming the OPT program for foreign students (which allows international students to work in the U.S.) in order to reduce fraud and improve protections for U.S. workers who may be impacted by employment of foreign students. Plans include limiting student work opportunities and terminating Obama’s STEM-OPT extension rule, which provides extended work authorization for foreign students with U.S. STEM degrees, from 17 months to 24 months.  

These announcements do not currently modify or rescind any of the above mentioned immigration programs, and any changes to immigration policy can only be accomplished through notice and comment of proposed rulemaking in the federal register. This means that individuals and companies that may be affected by potential policy changes will have an opportunity to submit comments to the government before the policy becomes effective. The notice/comment process can typically take in excess of 6 months, which means the administration may not have enough time to enact changes to the H-1B visa program in time for this year’s filing season (which begins on April 2, 2018). 

As always, individuals and employers who may impacted by any of these potential changes should contact us with questions on how to best prepare.

Diversity Visa Green Card Lottery Is Accepting Applications

The annual Diversity Immigrant Visa Lottery, which makes available 50,000 permanent resident visas ("green cards") to natives of countries deemed to have low rates of immigration to the U.S., is now open for online registration until November 7, 2017.  The Diversity Lottery is FREE and applications must be filed online through the official Department of State Diversity Lottery website.  Please visit the State Department Diversity Immigrant visa information site for eligibility information and to apply.  

Only applicants from certain eligible countries can apply in the Diversity Lottery, and must meet certain educational or work requirements (i.e. having a high school education or having worked in 2 of the last 5 years in a qualifying occupation).  

Lottery winners will be selected at random next year and can check whether they have been selected starting May 1, 2018.

Guidance for Trump's New Travel Ban

President Trump has rolled out a new travel ban, after the previous 90-day travel ban expired yesterday.  This new policy continues the existing travel restrictions to the U.S. for most citizens of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen, and now adds the countries of Chad, North Korea and Venezuela.  The new restrictions range from full travel bans on nationals from countries like Syria, Chad, and North Korea to more targeted restrictions for Venezuela, Iran, Libya, and Yemen.  For example, the suspension of nonimmigrant visas to citizens for Venezuela, applies only to senior government officials and their immediate families.  Iranian nationals will only be allowed to enter the U.S. using valid student and exchange visitor visas, but such visitors will have to undergo "enhanced screening and vetting requirements."

These news restrictions, which will take effect on October 18, 2017 and will be in place for an indefinite period of time.  The order does not apply to lawful permanent residents, existing visa-holders, or foreign nationals currently within the United States.  The Department of Homeland Security may also grant waivers on a case-by-case basis for students and workers with significant U.S. ties who happened to be outside the country when the order was enacted, among others.

Once again, as a result of these actions, many in the immigrant community are confused and scared – I understand!  Despite all that you read or hear in the news or from your friends and family, this is not a time to panic or to make hasty decisions.  It is a time for calm, rational thinking and for informed, conservative and proactive planning.  In that regard, I suggest the following:

  1. If you are a citizen of one of the countries listed in this new travel ban, do not travel out of the U.S.  The Executive Order does not apply to you if you merely visited one of these countries.
  2. If you have a non-immigrant visa and you plan to travel out of the U.S. please consult with an Immigration Attorney first.  In this climate of enhanced enforcement it is prudent to be able to document your status as much as possible in the event you are subject to additional scrutiny by an overly aggressive immigration officer upon your return.
  3. Consideration should be given to accelerating any immigration planning (i.e. extensions of status, green card processing, etc.) in order to take advantage of the existing laws and regulations. It is possible that these policies may continue to become more restrictive.

As evidenced by the prior travel bans, the current administration is intent on restricting travel to the U.S..  Once again, I sympathize with the fear and uncertainty many may be feeling right now - I come from a family of immigrants.  It pains me that the country whose doors gave my family refuge in their time of need is now trying to close those same doors to others.  I believe that these times too shall pass and that better times lie ahead.  Until then I will do everything I can to ease your fears and help you through this difficult period.

Please sign up for updates on the current situation and I will provide you with developments as they take place.  In the interim, please feel free to call me any time to discuss any of your concerns.

What DACA Recipients & Employers Need to Know About The End of DACA

President Trump has announced his plans to terminate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which provides “temporary relief from deportation” and work authorization for certain undocumented immigrants who arrived in the U.S. when they were minors. There are over 800,000 DACA beneficiaries across the country, the majority of whom are legally employed by U.S. employers.

As of September 6, 2017, U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) will no longer be accepting new DACA applications, however, current DACA recipients will be permitted to retain both the period of deferred action and their employment authorization until they expire. Individuals who currently have an initial DACA request pending with USCIS will have their cases adjudicated on a case-by-case basis. Those individuals with their deferred action expiring before March 5, 2018 must apply to renew their DACA (for a two-year period) before October 5, 2017. After March 6, 2018 no more DACA renewal applications will be accepted by USCIS.

WORK AUTHORIZATION

Through the DACA program, beneficiaries receive Employment Authorization Documents (also known as “work permits” or “EAD” cards) which provide lawful work authorization with U.S. employers. These cards are issued for limited periods of time and have expiration dates. Despite this new policy which will terminate the ability to renew EAD cards, current valid EAD cards will continue to provide lawful work authorization for those beneficiaries, until the EAD expires. This means DACA beneficiaries are allowed to legally continue working for U.S. employers with their EAD card until the expiration date on the card. While employers may not be aware of their employees who are on DACA until it comes time to reverify an employee’s work authorization in the Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification process, employers are not legally obligated to terminate an employee until after their EAD card has expired. 

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBERS, DRIVER’S LICENSES, AND ADVANCE PAROLE CARDS

Social security numbers for DACA recipients will remain valid and can continue to be used for banking, education, housing, and other reasons. Driver’s licenses should also remain valid until the expiration date of the card (but double check with your State’s motor vehicle department to confirm). While the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has indicated they will still honor valid Advance Parole documents, which provide immigration officers with discretionary authority to permit an individual to return to the U.S. after foreign travel, DACA beneficiaries are advised not to travel internationally, due to the risk of being denied re-entry into the U.S. upon return.

IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT

Information which DACA recipients provided to DHS in their DACA applications will not be proactively provided to Immigration Customs Enforcement (ICE), Customs and Border Protection (CBP), or shared with other law enforcement entities for the purpose of immigration enforcement proceedings, unless an individual poses a risk to national security or public safety. ICE has said that it has no plans to target DACA holders as their permits expire and that they will continue to remain low enforcement priorities. 

OTHER IMMIGRATION OPTIONS

DACA recipients may be eligible for other immigration relief either through family or employment. Employers with overseas offices may be able to employ affected individuals abroad. DACA recipients may be able to obtain work authorization and/or lawful residence in another country and may even be able to do so from within in the United States. 

Individuals and employers should contact qualified legal counsel to understand their options. As always, we will continue to monitor this recent DACA update and continue to provide additional analysis as information continues to become available. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us.

The End of the International Entrepreneur Rule

The Trump administration announced this week their intent to delay and ultimately rescind the International Entrepreneur Rule.  The rule, which was created by President Obama’s administration and which was set to go in to effect on July 17, 2017, would have allowed certain international entrepreneurs to be considered for parole (temporary permission to be in the United States) in order to start or grow their businesses in the U.S..  Applicants would have to show they met minimum requirements for capital investments and demonstrate that their startup would have been of benefit to the public via job creation in the U.S.

While the current administration is delaying the effective date of the International Entrepreneur Rule until March 14, 2018 and taking public comment on the rule, their intention is to rescind the rule.

For questions about this policy change, please feel free to contact us.  Foreign entrepreneurs and startups seeking alternative immigration options to the U.S. should read our article on entrepreneur visa options.  

Department of State’s Plans for “Extreme Vetting”

The U.S. State Department has announced new visa vetting procedures it plans to put into effect on May 18th, as part of President Trump’s “extreme vetting” visa policies.  Applicants subject to the vetting provisions would be required to provide the following information:

  • Travel history during the last 15 years, including source of funding for travel
  • Address history during the last 15 years
  • Employment history during the last 15 years
  • All passport numbers and country of issuance held by the applicant
  • Names and dates of birth for all siblings
  • Name and dates of birth for all children
  • Names and dates of birth for all current and former spouses, or civil or domestic partners
  • Social media platforms and identifiers/handles used during the last 5 years
  • Phone numbers and email addresses used during the last 5 years

Furthermore, the State Department explained that individuals may be selected for additional screening based on “individual circumstances” that may “lead U.S. consular officers at posts around the world to conclude the applicant warrants enhanced screening that takes into account” information from the additional questions listed above.

These additional stricter screening requirements are likely to result in potential administrative processing delays for some applicants.  Additionally, these new directives will likely cause slowdowns in visa issuance and an increase in visa denials.

Considerations for Applying for Naturalization

Based on the rapid changing immigration landscape many Lawful Permanent Residents (“green card” holders) are seeking to obtain the benefits of U.S. citizenship through the naturalization process.  Lawful Permanent Residents who are eligible for U.S. citizenship are afforded equal protection under U.S. laws regardless of their birth in another country.  

In order to be eligible for naturalization the applicant must:

  1. Be at least 18 years old at the time of filing;
  2. Possess Lawful Permanent Resident status (“green card”) for the last 5 years, or for the last 3 years if married to a U.S. citizen;
  3. Live in a state where you claim residence for at least 3 months prior to filing;
  4. Be physically present in the U.S. for at least half the time of the residency requirement (i.e. 30 of the last 60 months or 18 of the last 36 months if married to a U.S. citizen);
  5. Have no continuous absence of more than one year from the U.S., irrespective of the protection of a re-entry permit or SB-1 visa;
  6. Have filed U.S. income tax returns each year after becoming a lawful permanent resident;
  7. Have basic knowledge of U.S. history and government and the ability to read, write, speak, and understand basic English;
  8. Have good moral character (meaning you are not a habitual drunkard; polygamist; a person associated with prostitution, narcotics, or illegal entry of aliens; convicted of a crime of moral turpitude or of two or more non-political offenses for which the sentence imposed was 5 years or more; a gambler; committed an immigration fraud; convicted of murder or an aggravated felony; a non-support of dependents).

Court Temporarily Blocks Trump’s Travel Ban, and Airlines Are Told to Allow Passengers

Late yesterday (Friday), a federal judge in Seattle issued a temporary restraining order the practical effect of which is to put a stop to those portions of the presidents executive order that are keeping affected individuals from predominantly muslim countries (Iran, Iraq, Syria, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen) from entering the United States.  Based on that temporary restraining order, earlier today (Saturday), the Port Director of U.S. Customs & Border Patrol (CBP) at JFK airport advised that all CBP posts around the world are being authorized to notify airlines to allow such affected individuals to board aircraft bound for the United States.  Late today (Saturday), the Department of Justice indicated that it intends to file an emergency stay of this order.  

The practical upshot of all this is that there may now be a short window of opportunity for any affected individuals to enter the U.S.  To the extent this short window of opportunity may benefit any of your friends or employees, I urge you to communicate this information to them as soon as possible.  

This is clearly a fluid situation and subject to change on very short notice.  I will continue to keep you apprised of any developments.

In the interim, please call me if you have any questions.  

The Future for U.S. Work & Student Visa Programs Under Trump’s Next Executive Order

In follow up to last week’s Executive Orders, President Trump may be gearing up for his next round of Executive Orders which look to tighten U.S. work visa programs (including the H-1B visa), impose stricter limitations on foreign students, eliminate the International Entrepreneur Rule, and enact measures that will severely curtail the options for U.S. employers (especially in the tech sector) to attract the smartest and most innovative minds to our country. These proposed rules do not appear to suspend or terminate any foreign national’s current work authorization or visa status, but it does direct the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to review all immigration regulations that allow foreign nationals to wok in the United States. Let’s look at what this could mean for visa holders, employers, and all foreign travelers to the U.S. in the future:

How will this impact the H-1B work visa?

The Executive Order does not propose immediate changes to the upcoming (April 3, 2017) H-1B visa program, but it does indicate the administration’s intent to revise the H-1B work visa lottery system in the future to prioritize applications for those who are paid higher wages and/or have advanced education. 

How will this impact the F-1 OPT student programs?

The Executive Order directs DHS to “reform practical training programs for foreign students to prevent the disadvantaging of U.S. students in the workforce, better protect U.S. and foreign workers affected by such programs, … and improve monitoring of foreign students.” While this would seem to indicate that steps will be taken to curtail current Optional Practical Training (“OPT”) programs available to F-1 students, it is not clear how DHS will modify the regulations.

How will this impact current visa-case processing and/or Green Card priority dates?

The Executive Order directs DHS to “restore the integrity of employment based visa programs to better protect U.S. and foreign workers” affected by those programs. While this guidance is vague, this could signal an increase in Requests for Evidence and Notices of Intent to Deny in immigration cases, as immigration officers may begin to apply stricter adjudication standards. This may also mean the introduction of new employer obligations as it pertains to recruiting and/or prevailing wages. Any changes to the Visa Bulletin system could result in a retrogression in Visa Bulletin priority dates.

How will this impact the International Entrepreneur Rule?

While the proposed Executive Order does not single out the recently published International Entrepreneur Rule (set to go in to effect this summer), it does call for the elimination of any use of parole that “circumvents statutory immigration policy,” which essentially would end the rule.

How will this impact L-1 intra-company transferee visa holders?

The Executive Order directs DHS to conduct site visits to all places where L-1 visa holders (international executive and managers) work, including third-party worksites. It also directs DHS to begin conducting site visits for all visa categories within two years.

How will this impact business / tourist (B-1/B-2 visa) visitors?

The Executive Order directs DHS to clarify the types of activities that are and are not permissible for B-1/B-2 visa visitors. Individuals entering the U.S. on B-1/B-2 visitor visas, should anticipate more comprehensive scrutiny at all ports-of-entry.

 

These Executive Orders also direct the Department of Labor to investigate more abuses of work visa categories, and require more employers seeking to sponsor foreign workers to participate in the E-Verify employment authorization program.

Businesses, foreign workers, and international students considering filing for an H-1B work visa this year should begin preparing their H-1B visa petitions NOW. Demand for H-1B visas on behalf of foreign employees is expected to reach record levels this year. Due to lengthy prerequisite filing steps which must be completed before the H-1B petition can be submitted to USCIS on April 3rd, employers should begin preparing their petitions NOW to ensure they are ready on time.

Employers, foreign nationals, and international students who may be impacted by changes to any of these proposed regulations should contact an Attorney immediately to begin evaluating legal strategies.  If you have any other questions, please contact me.

Immigration Guidance for Trump's Executive Orders

Three Executive Orders were issued by President Trump last week – one related to the building of a wall along our border with Mexico, one related to enhanced immigration enforcement and one related to a travel ban for citizens of certain countries and limitations on refugees.  These actions have been drastic in terms of their impact as well as vague in terms of how they will be applied.  As a result of these actions, many in the immigrant community are confused and scared – I understand! 

I am writing this to help you navigate these turbulent waters.  Despite all that you read or hear in the news or from your friends and family, this is not a time to panic or to make hasty decisions.  It is a time for calm, rational thinking and for informed, conservative and proactive planning.  In that regard, I suggest the following:

  1. If you are a citizen of one of the “seven countries” listed on the Executive Order (Iran, Iraq, Syria, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen), do not travel out of the U.S.  The Executive Order does not apply to you if you merely visited one of the “seven countries”.
  2. If you are a citizen of any other country which has a predominantly Muslim population, do not travel out of the U.S. without consulting with an Immigration Attorney first.
  3. If you have a non-immigrant visa (even if you are a citizen of a country which is not predominantly Muslim) and you plan to travel out of the U.S. please consult with an Immigration Attorney first.  In this climate of enhanced enforcement it is prudent to be able to document your status as much as possible in the event you are subject to additional scrutiny by an overly aggressive immigration officer upon your return.
  4. Consideration should be given to accelerating any immigration planning (eg; extensions of status, green card processing, etc.) in order to take advantage of the existing laws and regulations. It is possible that these may become more restrictive as the policies of the current administration continue to evolve.

It is my belief that more executive orders will be forthcoming - which are likely to add to the fear and uncertainty that you may be feeling.  I sympathize with what you may be feeling right now - I come from a family of immigrants.  It pains me that the country whose doors gave my family refuge in their time of need is now trying to close those same doors to others.  I believe that these times too shall pass and that better times lie ahead.  Until then I will do everything I can to ease your fears and help you through this difficult period.

Please sign up for updates on the current situation and I will provide you with developments as they take place.  In the interim, please feel free to call me any time to discuss any of your concerns.

The International Entrepreneur Rule

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has officially annouced the final version of the International Entrepreneur Rule, which will allow certain international entrepreneurs to be considered for parole (temporary permission to be in the United States) so that they may start or grow their businesses here in the United States.

The rule, which is set to take effect on July 16, 2017, will grant foreign entrepreneurs of startup entities created within five years of application, temporary stay in the U.S. for up to 2 1/2 years, with the option to extend the stay by an additional 2 1/2 years.  To qualify initially, founders must own at least 10% of their companies and have raised at least $250,000 from U.S. investors with a track record of U.S. investments, or at least $100,000 from federal, state, or local government agencies.  To be eligible for the extension, founders must continue running their U.S. business, retain at least 5% ownership, and either raise at least $500,000 from U.S. investors, generate $500,000 in annual revenue with 20% year-over-year growth, or prove they've created at least 5 full-time jobs for U.S. workers. 

The rule will also provide the foreign entrepreneur’s dependents (spouses and children under 21) with U.S. parole entry and allow them to apply for unrestricted U.S. work authorization.  The parolee, however, will only be eligible for employment with his or her USCIS-approved startup. 

The International Entrepreneur Rule has been broadened from the proposed rule made in August to accommodate more foreign entrepreneurs.  For more information on the new rule, please feel free to contact us.

New Rules For Employment-based Immigrant & Nonimmigrant Visa Programs

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has published new regulations to provide greater flexibility for high-skilled foreign workers who have an approved employment-based immigrant visa petition, while they wait for a green card.  The intent of these new rules will better enable U.S. employers to sponsor and retain high-skilled foreign workers, increase the ability of such workers to seek promotions, accept lateral positions, change employers, or pursue other employment options.  

The highlights of this rule change, include:

  • Retention of Approved Immigration Visa (I-140) Petitions:  Immigrant petitions submitted by U.S. employers to request permanent employment on behalf of a foreign national (Form I-140) may no longer be automatically revoked based on a request by the employer to withdraw the petition.  Additionally, the immigrant petition will not be revoked if the the request to withdraw is based on the termination of the employer’s business 180 days after either the I-140’s approval or the filing of an I-485 application for adjustment of status.  While the I-140 would remain valid, the foreign national would need a new job offer or new petition in order to apply for a green card.
  • Nonimmigrant Visa Grace Periods:  A one-time grace period of up to 60 days whenever employment ends, will allow for greater job portability for nonimmigrant workers (especially H-1B, E-1, E-2, E-3, L-1, O-1 and TN visa holders).  During the grace period the nonimmigrant worker may apply for an extension of stay or change of status.  While the nonimmigrant will not be authorized for employment during the grace period, it will provide flexibility to allow for new employment in case of sudden termination.
  • Employment Authorization in Compelling Circumstances:  In compelling circumstances, DHS will allow certain individuals with an approved I-140 petition, who are unable to obtain an immigrant visa because of numerical limits, to apply for a one-year employment authorization document (EAD).  This new rule would only apply to individuals in E-3, H-1B, H-1B1, L-1 or O-1 status.  DHS has identified “compelling circumstances” as serious illness or disabilities, employer retaliation, other substantial harm to the applicant, or significant disruption to the employer.
  • Employment Authorization Document Processing:  Certain individuals may be granted automatic EAD extensions for up to 180 days, so long as they timely renew their EAD and it is based on the same employment authorization category as the existing EAD.  The extension is available only to certain foreign nationals, including adjustment of status applicants and individuals filing for renewal of Optional Practical Training (OPT) based on a degree in a Science, Technology, Engineering, or Math (STEM) field. This provision does not apply to H-4, L-2, or E nonimmigrant spouses seeking an EAD renewal.

The new regulation will become effective January 17, 2017, three days before Donald Trump takes office.  These regulations should remain in place, unless Congress acts to cancel them.  Please contact our office for further questions or clarification.