What DACA Recipients & Employers Need to Know About The End of DACA

President Trump has announced his plans to terminate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which provides “temporary relief from deportation” and work authorization for certain undocumented immigrants who arrived in the U.S. when they were minors. There are over 800,000 DACA beneficiaries across the country, the majority of whom are legally employed by U.S. employers.

As of September 6, 2017, U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) will no longer be accepting new DACA applications, however, current DACA recipients will be permitted to retain both the period of deferred action and their employment authorization until they expire. Individuals who currently have an initial DACA request pending with USCIS will have their cases adjudicated on a case-by-case basis. Those individuals with their deferred action expiring before March 5, 2018 must apply to renew their DACA (for a two-year period) before October 5, 2017. After March 6, 2018 no more DACA renewal applications will be accepted by USCIS.

WORK AUTHORIZATION

Through the DACA program, beneficiaries receive Employment Authorization Documents (also known as “work permits” or “EAD” cards) which provide lawful work authorization with U.S. employers. These cards are issued for limited periods of time and have expiration dates. Despite this new policy which will terminate the ability to renew EAD cards, current valid EAD cards will continue to provide lawful work authorization for those beneficiaries, until the EAD expires. This means DACA beneficiaries are allowed to legally continue working for U.S. employers with their EAD card until the expiration date on the card. While employers may not be aware of their employees who are on DACA until it comes time to reverify an employee’s work authorization in the Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification process, employers are not legally obligated to terminate an employee until after their EAD card has expired. 

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBERS, DRIVER’S LICENSES, AND ADVANCE PAROLE CARDS

Social security numbers for DACA recipients will remain valid and can continue to be used for banking, education, housing, and other reasons. Driver’s licenses should also remain valid until the expiration date of the card (but double check with your State’s motor vehicle department to confirm). While the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has indicated they will still honor valid Advance Parole documents, which provide immigration officers with discretionary authority to permit an individual to return to the U.S. after foreign travel, DACA beneficiaries are advised not to travel internationally, due to the risk of being denied re-entry into the U.S. upon return.

IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT

Information which DACA recipients provided to DHS in their DACA applications will not be proactively provided to Immigration Customs Enforcement (ICE), Customs and Border Protection (CBP), or shared with other law enforcement entities for the purpose of immigration enforcement proceedings, unless an individual poses a risk to national security or public safety. ICE has said that it has no plans to target DACA holders as their permits expire and that they will continue to remain low enforcement priorities. 

OTHER IMMIGRATION OPTIONS

DACA recipients may be eligible for other immigration relief either through family or employment. Employers with overseas offices may be able to employ affected individuals abroad. DACA recipients may be able to obtain work authorization and/or lawful residence in another country and may even be able to do so from within in the United States. 

Individuals and employers should contact qualified legal counsel to understand their options. As always, we will continue to monitor this recent DACA update and continue to provide additional analysis as information continues to become available. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us.

The End of the International Entrepreneur Rule

The Trump administration announced this week their intent to delay and ultimately rescind the International Entrepreneur Rule.  The rule, which was created by President Obama’s administration and which was set to go in to effect on July 17, 2017, would have allowed certain international entrepreneurs to be considered for parole (temporary permission to be in the United States) in order to start or grow their businesses in the U.S..  Applicants would have to show they met minimum requirements for capital investments and demonstrate that their startup would have been of benefit to the public via job creation in the U.S.

While the current administration is delaying the effective date of the International Entrepreneur Rule until March 14, 2018 and taking public comment on the rule, their intention is to rescind the rule.

For questions about this policy change, please feel free to contact us.  Foreign entrepreneurs and startups seeking alternative immigration options to the U.S. should read our article on entrepreneur visa options.  

NEW Immigration Options Coming for Entrepreneurs & Startups

U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) will be announcing today a proposed rule which will allow certain international entrepreneurs to be considered for parole (temporary permission to be in the United States) so that they may start or scale their businesses here in the United States.

The proposed rule would allow the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to grant foreign entrepreneurs of startup entities temporary stay in the U.S. (up to 2 years, with a possible 3 year extension), so long as the foreign national can evidence that he/she will be providing a significant public benefit through the substantial and demonstrated potential for rapid business growth and job creation.  To be eligible, international entrepreneurs of startup enterprises will have to demonstrate:

  • A significant ownership interest in the startup (at least 15 percent) and have an active and central role to its operations;
  • Show their startup was formed in the United States within the past three years; and
  • Has substantial and demonstrated potential for rapid business growth and job creation, as evidenced by: (1) receipt of significant investment of capital (at least $345,000) from certain qualified U.S. investors with established records of successful investments; (2) receipt of significant awards or grants (at least $100,000) from certain federal, state or local government entities; or (3) partially satisfying one or both of the above criteria in addition to other reliable and compelling evidence of the startup entity’s substantial potential for rapid growth and job creation.

The rule will not take affect until after a 45 day public comment period and until it is published in the Federal Register.  Once published, however, this rule will help our economy grow by expanding immigration options for foreign entrepreneurs who meet certain criteria for creating jobs, attracting investment and generating revenue in the U.S.