Supreme Court Allows Partial Travel Ban

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled to partially unblock President Trump’s executive order temporarily banning travel to the U.S. from the following predominantly muslim countries: Iran, Syria, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen.  The ruling will keep in place part of the lower court injunction, but will reinstate a travel ban for foreign nationals “who lack any bona fide relationship” with any person or entity in the United States. 

The practical upshot of this is that foreign nationals of these 6 countries should expect that the travel ban will now be enforced against them, thereby barring their travel to the U.S. for a period of 90 days, unless they are able to demonstrate a relationship with a person (e.g., a family member) or an entity (e.g., school, employer, host organization) in the U.S.  In other words, the travel ban may not be enforced against individuals from these 6 countries so long as the individual can prove they have a family relationship with someone in the U.S. or a relationship with a U.S. entity, (i.e. attendance at a U.S. university or employment with a U.S. employer).  While other relationships may also qualify, none were specifically mentioned in the decision.

Foreign nationals traveling to the U.S. from Iran, Syria, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen should now plan to travel with evidence of their family relationships in the U.S. (i.e. affidavits, birth certificates, marriage certificates), or evidence of their enrollment in a U.S. school (i.e. student visa, Form I-20), or employment (work visa, visa petition approval notices, pay stubs, letters verifying employment).  Additionally, travelers from these countries should be prepared to answer questions about their U.S. family members or employment.

The Supreme Court will hear arguments on the merits of the executive order in October 2017.  In the meantime, if you have any questions on how this ruling may impact you or your employees, please feel free to contact us.

New and Easier Process for US Citizens to Obtain Tourist Visa to India

India has eased rules and streamlined the visa process to allow tourists from the US (and 42 other countries) to obtain a tourist visa to India upon arrival.  To obtain this new electronic visa (valid for 30 days) applicants should file an online application at lease 4 days in advance of their travel date at the Indian government's Tourist Visa on Arrival website.  Applicants will need to upload a photo and the page of their U.S. passport with relevant details (name, date of birth, etc.), and pay $60 by debit or credit card plus handling fees.  Applicants will then receive an email authorizing travel in India.  Print a copy of this to take with you and present it with your passport when you arrive.  Your passport must be valid for at least six months.