Didn’t Get An H-1B Visa? Here Are Your Alternative Immigration Options.

U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) has announced that it reached the annual 85,000 H-1B visa cap in the first five days of April 2019.  Specifically, USCIS received 201,011 H-1B cap cases (an increase from last year), which means that once again, USCIS will conduct a computer-generated lottery in the coming weeks to determine which petitions they will process. Employers who have their petitions selected in the lottery will receive a receipt notice from USCIS, and if approved, can have their employees begin working for them in H-1B status on October 1, 2019. Petitions that are not selected in the lottery will be returned to the employers with their money back.

USCIS will continue, however, to accept H-1B petitions year-round from employers who are exempt from the H-1B cap (such as universities, nonprofits affiliated with institutions of higher education, or nonprofit research organizations), as well as petitions to extend the status of those currently in H-1B status or for those in H-1B status seeking to change employers.

While no more new H-1B visas will be available for employers and foreign nationals seeking to apply in 2019, many candidates may be eligible for other alternative visa options. The following visa categories are available throughout the year, without numerical caps, for qualifying foreign nationals:

  • L-1 Visa: For intracompany transferees who have worked for a foreign entity for one year and are seeking to transfer to a U.S. subsidiary, affiliate, parent, or branch office in the U.S. in a managerial, executive, or specialized knowledge capacity

  • E-1/E-2 Visa: For international investors or traders from certain treaty countries looking to engage in substantial trade between the U.S. and their foreign country or to develop and direct the operations of an enterprise in which the foreign national has invested. The E-1/E-2 visa is a great option for foreign entrepreneurs seeking to work in an essential capacity for their U.S. entity.

  • O-1 Visa: For foreign nationals of extraordinary ability who have achieved national and international recognition for extraordinary achievements in their field of endeavor.

  • TN Visa: For Canadian and Mexican citizens employed in certain professional categories seeking to engage in U.S. employment. Examples of qualifying TN professional occupations include, but are not limited to Engineer, Accountant, Architect, Computer Systems Analyst, Geologist, Geophysicist, Graphic Designer, Management Consultant, Scientific Technician, Engineering Technicians, and many occupations in the medical and allied health field.

  • H-3 Visa: For foreign nationals coming to the U.S. to engage in a course of training.

  • E-3 Visa: For Australian citizens who will be employed in a specialty occupation in the U.S. (similar requirements to the H-1B visa).

Watch our immigration videos for additional information on these visas and to learn more about the eligibility requirements. As always, if you have questions about the H-1B visa cap or any of these work visa options, please contact our office.

A Guide For Winning The H-1B Visa Lottery

Starting April 1, 2019, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will begin accepting this year’s H-1B visa petitions. As in years past, if USCIS receives more than the available 85,000 H-1B visas in the first few days of April, they will use a computer-generated random lottery to select the petitions they will process.  Even though the H-1B lottery selection process will change this year, based on the number of petitions received in the first few days of April last year (over 190,000) and the previous year (over 199,000), combined with the current market demand for high-skilled labor and reports of possible changes to visa programs in the future, many our anticipating that USCIS will receive over 200,000 H-1B petitions in the first few days of this April. 

Accordingly, time is running out for employers to timely prepare their H-1B petitions for submission to play in this H-1B lottery on April 1st. Generally, it takes at least 10-14 days to prepare and file an H-1B petition, due to the prerequisite filing requirements of the Labor Condition Application (LCA), which takes up to 7 business days to certify. Therefore, if you are responsible for your businesses' immigration planning and processing and you have already identified your H-1B candidates, please initiate the H-1B visa process in the next two weeks to ensure it is timely filed. 

In spite of recent reports of proposed changes to the H-1B work visa program by the Trump administration, the H-1B filing process and procedures will remain largely the same as it has in previous years. Nevertheless, as indicated by the massive increase of Requests for Evidence (RFE) and denials of H-1B petitions issued by USCIS over the past year, employers and foreign nationals should be prepared to evidence the following, in order to increase their chances of getting their visa petitions approved:

  1. Document the specific scope and educational requirements for the position to show that the position is one which requires a Bachelor’s degree as a minimum to enter the occupation.

  2. Review the prevailing wage rates for the occupation through the Department of Labor’s Wage Surveys to determine whether the wage level is appropriate for the professional position you are hiring for.

  3. Document the nexus between the foreign national’s degree and the occupation they will be hired for.

Needless to say, the H-1B visa petition can be a technical and cumbersome application to file.  Working with qualified counsel will help to ensure technical mistakes are avoided and that a comprehensive petition will have the best chance at winning in the H-1B visa lottery.  If you have any questions about the H-1B visa process, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

H-1B Visa Lottery Changes & The Return of Premium Processing

In follow up to last month’s announcement of proposed changes to the H-1B visa selection process by U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS), the Department of Homeland Security has finalized its rule reversing the order in which USCIS will select H-1B cap-subject petitions in the H-1B visa lottery. 

While the H-1B cap will remain at 85,000, this new regulation will reverse the lottery order in which USCIS selects H-1B petitions for adjudication, in order to increase the amount of H-1B visas awarded to foreign nationals with U.S. master’s degrees and higher.  Under the previous lottery system, USCIS would first conduct a lottery for 20,000 H-1B visas for individuals with a U.S. master’s degrees and higher (the “advanced degree cap”), and then those individuals with advanced degrees who were not selected in that lottery were added to the pool of 65,000 H-1B visas (the “regular cap”), for another chance to be selected with individuals who only have a bachelor’s degree.  In accordance with this new rule, USCIS will now conduct the regular cap lottery first and include all advanced degree holders.  Those with advanced degrees not selected in the“regular cap” will thereafter be placed in a second lottery (the “advanced degree cap”), if there are enough advanced degree holders to meet the advanced-degree lottery.

In accordance with the Trump administration’s previous announcements for employment-immigration reforms, USCIS believes this change to the lottery system will increase the chances of H-1B visas being awarded to individuals with U.S. master’s degrees and higher.   

While USCIS announced that this change to the H-1B visa selection process will be implemented for this year’s H-1B visa lottery, USCIS will be postponing its proposed mandatory online registration for U.S. employer’s filing H-1B petitions.  As such, employers and foreign nationals should be preparing their H-1B visa petitions NOW (as they have done in previous years) in order to timely have those petitions filed on April 1st.

Additionally, USCIS announced this week they have resumed “premium processing” for all H-1B visa petitions that remain pending from the April 2018 lottery.  USCIS had temporarily suspended premium processing for most H-1B petitions last year, but has removed the suspension, as of now, for only H-1B visa petitions that remain pending from the April 2018 lottery.  While premium processing is still currently unavailable for H-1B transfers, amendments, and extensions with different employers, we may see premium processing for these cases resume around February 19th.

Employers seeking to hire foreign national employees this year should assess their upcoming workforce needs and identify those who will require H-1B visa sponsorship NOW. These individuals may include:

·       New graduating foreign students in the U.S.

·       Overseas individuals seeking to start work in the U.S.

·       Foreign individuals in the U.S. already working under a different nonimmigrant status for a different employer and are seeking to change jobs

Failure to file your H-1B petition on April 1st may jeopardize your chance at securing an H-1B visa for your employee. After the 2019 H-1B visas are gone, employers will have to wait until April 1, 2020 to file H-1B petitions again, and foreign employees may lose their lawful status and authorization to work. The clock is ticking…don't delay!

If you have any questions about the H-1B visa process, contact me.

New H-1B Visa Lottery Process

U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services  (USCIS) has announced a proposed rule that will dramatically shift how H-1B visa petitions are selected in its H-1B cap lottery selection system.  The proposed regulation would create a mandatory online preregistration system for employers to register each individual’s H-1B cap petition and reverse the order in which USCIS selects H-1B petitions under the H-1B cap and advanced degree exemptions.

Currently, the H-1B visa allows U.S. employers to temporarily employ foreign nationals with a bachelor’s degree or higher in occupations that require a theoretical and practical body of highly specialized knowledge.  Each year, on April 1st, USCIS makes 85,000 H-1B visas available.  If USCIS received more than 85,000 petitions, they institute a computer-generated lottery system to randomly select the petitions that will be adjudicated. 

Employer Pre-Registration System

Under this proposed rule, USCIS would create a mandatory online preregistration process whereby those employers who intend to file H-1B cap petitions would be required to submit an online registration for each potential H-1B beneficiary, during a designated registration period before April 1st.  USCIS would then conduct a lottery and select registrations to meet the H-1B visa cap.  Those registrations that are selected will be notified and given a 60-day window in which to file their H-1B visa petition on behalf of the foreign worker named in the original registration.  According to the proposal, an employer could potentially wait until they have been notified of selection before filing a Labor Condition Application and preparing the corresponding H-1B petition for the intended beneficiary.

The online registration would request information about the employer (i.e. company name, address, Federal Employer Identification Number, etc.), along with information about the intended H-1B worker (i.e. name, date of birth, citizenship, passport, and education credentials).  There will be no fee to register an H-1B worker, but employers would be limited to one registration per individual per year.

The preregistration period would begin at least 14 days before April 1st and last for at least two weeks.  USCIS would announce the dates for the preregistration period online at least 30 days before it starts.   

New Lottery Selection Process

While the H-1B cap will remain at 85,000, USCIS intends to reverse the lottery order in which it selects H-1B petitions for adjudication, to increase the amount of H-1B visas awarded to foreign nationals with U.S. master’s degrees and higher.  Currently, USCIS first conducts a lottery for 20,000 H-1B visas for individuals with a U.S. master’s degrees and higher (the “advanced degree cap”).  Those individuals with advanced degrees not selected in that lottery are added to the pool of 65,000 H-1B visas (the “regular cap”), for another chance to be selected with individuals who only have a bachelor’s degree.  Under the proposed rule, USCIS would conduct the regular cap lottery first and include all advanced degree holders.  Those with advanced degrees not selected in the regular cap would be placed in a second lottery, if there are enough advanced degree holders to meet the advanced-degree lottery.

In accordance with the Trump administration’s previous announcements for employment-immigration reforms, USCIS believes this change to the lottery system would increase the chances of H-1B visas to be awarded to individuals with U.S. master’s degrees and higher.   

Implementation

Currently, these are only proposed rule changes.  While USCIS has stated their intention to have these new rules in place before the April 1, 2019 H-1B visa season, the proposed regulations also would allow USCIS to temporarily suspend the registration process due to technical challenges with the registration process or online system.  In the meantime, employers and foreign nationals should submit their public comments on this proposal HERE, before January 2nd.

What Employers & Foreign Nationals Should Do Now

Regardless of whether USCIS will be able to implement these changes before the April 1st H-1B filing deadline, employers and foreign nationals should begin preparing H-1B petitions NOW for the possibility that they will need to submit their complete H-1B visa petitions on April 1st.   

For any questions on the H-1B visa process or these changes, please feel free to contact me.

Temporary Suspension & Increased Costs for "Premium Processing"​ of Visas

U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) has announced two major changes to their "premium processing" programs, which allows employers and foreign nationals to pay an optional USCIS filing fee to guarantee a response on their petition within 15 days.  The first announcement is an increase in the premium processing fee.  Beginning October 1, 2018 the premium processing fee will increase from $1,225 to $1,410.  

USCIS' second announcement is an extension of their ongoing suspension of “premium processing” for most H-1B visa petitions until February 19, 2019.  USCIS had previously announced that they were temporarily suspending premium processing for new, cap-subject H-1B visa petitions until September 10, 2018.  This new announcement, however, extends the previously annouced temporary suspension through February 19, 2019.  Additionally, beginning September 11, 2019, USCIS will also stop accepting premium processing for any H-1B petition seeking new employment, transfer (i.e. “change of employer”), or amendment which are filed with either the Vermont or California Service Centers until February 19, 2019.

USCIS will, however, continue to accept premium processing for H-1B petitions filed at the Nebraska Service Center by an employer requesting a “continuation of previously approved employment without change with the same employer,” and premium processing for H-1B cap-exempt petitions (such as university, nonprofit research institutions, government research organizations) which are filed only with the California Service Center.

While this temporary suspension of premium processing now impacts most H-1B petitions, it does not affect premium processing for other nonimmigrant visa petitions (including L-1, O-1, TN, and others).  Additionally, USCIS will continue to accept premium processing for H-1B petitions filed prior to September 11, 2018 (when the suspension goes into effect).

This announcement is likely to have a major impact on U.S. employers, international students, and most immigrants seeking U.S. work visas.  First, this news likely means that USCIS processing times for all USCIS filings may increase, causing delays in visa issuance.  Even though, in cases of an H-1B transfer, an H-1B employee can begin working with a new employer upon the filing of the transfer with USCIS, many H-1B employees prefer to wait until they actually receive their H-1B transfer approval notice from USCIS before starting employment with a new employer.  As a result, this may cause delays for employers seeking to onboard new employees.

Additionally, international students currently availing H-1B “cap gap” extensions of their OPT and still awaiting USCIS approval of their cap-subject H-1B petition will need to be mindful of their authorized stay in light of USCIS’ recent unlawful presence memorandum for foreign students.  

In light of this news, H-1B employers and foreign nationals seeking to file any H-1B petitions should plan accordingly.  For assistance in preparing for these or delays, please feel free to contact us.

Immigration Policy Changes for Foreign Students & Exchange Visitors

U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) has recently issued two updates that may have major consequences for foreign students and exchange visitors.

Most recently, USCIS issued a policy memorandum which changes the way USCIS will interpret and calculate unlawful presence for F-1 and J-1 visa holders (including their dependents).  Generally, a foreign national who remains in the U.S. beyond the expiration date of their I-94 Arrival/Departure Record begins to accrue unlawful presence, and in certain circumstances, may be subject to a 3-year or 10-year bar to re-admission to the United States.  Under the previous policy, however, foreign national students and exchange visitors who are granted duration of status (D/S) would not begin to accrue unlawful presence until either USCIS made a formal determination that a status violation had occurred or an immigration judge ordered a foreign national deported.

Under the new policy, starting August 9, 2018, F-1 and J-1 visa holders will begin to accrue unlawful presence on the earliest of the following:

  • The day after the student/exchange visitor no longer pursues the course of study or authorized activity, or the day after the person engages in unauthorized activity
  • The day after the grace period, after completing the course of study, program, or practical training (OPT/CPT)
  • The day after the person’s Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record expires;
  • The day after an Immigration Judge orders the person deported or removed.

Simply put, this new policy, will have a dramatic impact on F-1 and J-1 nonimmigrants who are not vigilant with respect to maintaining valid status and/or are engaging in “unauthorized activity.”  

Additionally, last month, USCIS updated its website regarding STEM OPT extensions , which allow F-1 STEM gradates to obtain an additional 24 months of Optional Practical Training (OPT) work authorization to work for employers that participate in the E-Verify program.  The new USCIS guidance no longer permits students to engage in STEM OPT at third party worksite locations (even if the employer maintains the requisite employer-employee relationship with the STEM worker).

This new guidance changes previous policy which only required the student be a bona fide employee of the employer signing the I-983 training plan.  Now, any employees performing duties at sites not controlled by the E-Verify employer could risk being in violation of their status.

These updates are very nuanced and complex, especially when it comes to when and whether someone is in violation of their status or engaged in unauthorized activities.  As always, if you have questions on these issues or how to maintain status, please don’t hesitate to contact me

H-1B Visa Cap Met. What Are Your Alternative Immigration Options?

U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) has announced that it reached the annual 85,000 H-1B visa cap in the first five days of April 2018.  Specifically, USCIS received 190,098 H-1B cap cases (a 4% drop from last year), which means that once again, USCIS will conduct a computer-generated lottery in the coming weeks to determine which petitions they will process. Employers who have their petitions selected in the lottery will receive a receipt notice from USCIS, and if approved, can have their employees begin working for them in H-1B status on October 1, 2018. Petitions that are not selected in the lottery will be returned to the employers with their money back.

USCIS will continue, however, to accept H-1B petitions year-round from employers who are exempt from the H-1B cap (such as universities, nonprofits affiliated with institutions of higher education, or nonprofit research organizations), as well as petitions to extend the status of those currently in H-1B status or for those in H-1B status seeking to change employers.

While no more new H-1B visas will be available for employers and foreign nationals seeking to apply in 2018, many candidates may be eligible for other alternative visa options. The following visa categories are available throughout the year, without numerical caps, for qualifying foreign nationals:

  • L-1 Visa: For intracompany transferees who have worked for a foreign entity for one year and are seeking to transfer to a U.S. subsidiary, affiliate, parent, or branch office in the U.S. in a managerial, executive, or specialized knowledge capacity
  • E-1/E-2 Visa: For international investors or traders from certain treaty countries looking to engage in substantial trade between the U.S. and their foreign country or to develop and direct the operations of an enterprise in which the foreign national has invested. The E-1/E-2 visa is a great option for foreign entrepreneurs seeking to work in an essential capacity for their U.S. entity.
  • O-1 Visa: For foreign nationals of extraordinary ability who have achieved national and international recognition for extraordinary achievements in their field of endeavor.
  • TN Visa: For Canadian and Mexican citizens employed in certain professional categories seeking to engage in U.S. employment. Examples of qualifying TN professional occupations include, but are not limited to Engineer, Accountant, Architect, Computer Systems Analyst, Geologist, Geophysicist, Graphic Designer, Management Consultant, Scientific Technician, Engineering Technicians, and many occupations in the medical and allied health field.
  • H-3 Visa: For foreign nationals coming to the U.S. to engage in a course of training.
  • E-3 Visa: For Australian citizens who will be employed in a specialty occupation in the U.S. (similar requirements to the H-1B visa).

Watch our immigration videos for additional information on these visas and to learn more about the eligibility requirements. As always, if you have questions about the H-1B visa cap or any of these work visa options, please contact our office.

H-1B Visa Season Starts NOW

In light of recent reports of proposed changes to the H-1B work visa program by the Trump administration, U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) has confirmed several important details about the upcoming H-1B visa filing season, which will commence on April 2, 2018. Most importantly, USCIS intends for the H-1B filing process and procedures to remain the same as it has in previous years. This is to say that there will be no "preregistration system" and if the petitions received by USCIS exceed the 85,000 numerical cap, a lottery will be used to select the petitions for processing. USCIS also hinted that they may impose a "short" suspension of "premium processing" for H-1B cap petitions (but not non-cap H-1B petitions), as they did last year.

Demand by U.S. employers for H-1B visas on behalf of “highly-skilled” foreign employees was, once again, at high levels last year and is expected to remain high this year. Because it is expected that the 85,000 available H-1B visas will be gone within the first week of April, U.S. businesses should file their H-1B visa petitions on April 2, 2018. Due to prerequisite filing steps which must be completed before the H-1B petition can be submitted to USCIS, however, employers should begin preparing their petitions now to ensure they are ready to submit on April 2nd.

Despite rumors of potential changes to the H-1B visa program, the H-1B filing process and procedures will remain the same as they did in previous years.  Therefore, employers should assess their upcoming workforce needs and identify whether any foreign national employees will require H-1B visa sponsorship. These individuals may include:

  • New graduating foreign students in the U.S.
  • Overseas individuals seeking to start work in the U.S.
  • Foreign individuals in the U.S. already working under a different nonimmigrant status for a different employer and are seeking to change jobs

Failure to file your H-1B petition on April 2nd may jeopardize your chance at securing an H-1B visa for your employee. After the 2018 H-1B visas are gone, employers will have to wait until April 1, 2019 to file H-1B petitions again, and foreign employees may lose their lawful status and authorization to work. The clock is ticking…don't delay!

If you have any questions about the H-1B visa process, contact me.

Potential Changes to High-Skilled Immigration Programs in 2018

The Trump administration’s future immigration intentions were recently announced in their semi-annual Unified Agenda. The Unified Agenda lists possible regulations under development by federal agencies for the coming year. The announcement indicates the administration’s plans to undo Obama administration immigration benefits and impose tighter restrictions on nonimmigrant visa categories, such as the H-1B, H-4, and Optional Practical Training (OPT) for F-1 students.

The agenda specifies the administration’s intent to make the following policy changes in connection with Trump’s “Buy American, Hire American” executive order:

  • H-1B Eligibility: Redefining what a “speciality occupation” is for H-1B visa purposes to “increase the focus on truly obtaining the best and brightest.” The proposal would also “revise the definition of employment and employer-employee relationship to better protect U.S. workers and wages.” This includes “additional requirements to ensure employers pay appropriate wages to H-1B visa holders.” The rule would also impose additional restrictions on H-1B dependent employers that rely on large H-1B workforces and those employers who have H-1B employees working off-site.
  • H-1B Lottery: Revising the H-1B visa lottery system to establish an electronic pre-registration program for cap-subject H-1B applicants, and tweaking the electronic lottery selection process to award visas to the “most skilled or highest-paid petition beneficiaries.”  
  • H-4 Work Authorization: Elimination of the regulation that allow H-4 visa holders (spouses of H-1B visa holders) to apply for work authorization. The Trump administration has previously indicated its intent to remove this Obama rule which has provided work permits to thousands of H-4 spouses.
  • OPT for F-1 Students: Reforming the OPT program for foreign students (which allows international students to work in the U.S.) in order to reduce fraud and improve protections for U.S. workers who may be impacted by employment of foreign students. Plans include limiting student work opportunities and terminating Obama’s STEM-OPT extension rule, which provides extended work authorization for foreign students with U.S. STEM degrees, from 17 months to 24 months.  

These announcements do not currently modify or rescind any of the above mentioned immigration programs, and any changes to immigration policy can only be accomplished through notice and comment of proposed rulemaking in the federal register. This means that individuals and companies that may be affected by potential policy changes will have an opportunity to submit comments to the government before the policy becomes effective. The notice/comment process can typically take in excess of 6 months, which means the administration may not have enough time to enact changes to the H-1B visa program in time for this year’s filing season (which begins on April 2, 2018). 

As always, individuals and employers who may impacted by any of these potential changes should contact us with questions on how to best prepare.

The End of the International Entrepreneur Rule

The Trump administration announced this week their intent to delay and ultimately rescind the International Entrepreneur Rule.  The rule, which was created by President Obama’s administration and which was set to go in to effect on July 17, 2017, would have allowed certain international entrepreneurs to be considered for parole (temporary permission to be in the United States) in order to start or grow their businesses in the U.S..  Applicants would have to show they met minimum requirements for capital investments and demonstrate that their startup would have been of benefit to the public via job creation in the U.S.

While the current administration is delaying the effective date of the International Entrepreneur Rule until March 14, 2018 and taking public comment on the rule, their intention is to rescind the rule.

For questions about this policy change, please feel free to contact us.  Foreign entrepreneurs and startups seeking alternative immigration options to the U.S. should read our article on entrepreneur visa options.  

Demand For H-1B Visas This Year May Exceed 300,000

Starting April 3, 2017, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will begin accepting H-1B petitions for Fiscal Year 2018 (FY2018).  As in years past, if USCIS receives more than the available 85,000 H-1B visas in the first few days of April, they will use a computer-generated random lottery to select the petitions they will process.  Based on the number of petitions received in the first few days of last year (over 236,000) and the market demand for high-skilled labor, our office anticipates USCIS receiving over 300,000 H-1B petitions in the first few days of April. 

Accordingly, time is running out for employers to timely prepare their H-1B petitions for submission on April 3rd.  Generally, it takes at least 10-14 days to prepare and file an H-1B petition, due to the prerequisite filing requirements of the Labor Condition Application (LCA), which takes up to 7 business days to certify.  Therefore, if you are responsible for your businesses' immigration planning and processing and you have already identified your H-1B candidates, please initiate the H-1B visa process in the next two weeks to ensure it is timely filed.  

The International Entrepreneur Rule

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has officially annouced the final version of the International Entrepreneur Rule, which will allow certain international entrepreneurs to be considered for parole (temporary permission to be in the United States) so that they may start or grow their businesses here in the United States.

The rule, which is set to take effect on July 16, 2017, will grant foreign entrepreneurs of startup entities created within five years of application, temporary stay in the U.S. for up to 2 1/2 years, with the option to extend the stay by an additional 2 1/2 years.  To qualify initially, founders must own at least 10% of their companies and have raised at least $250,000 from U.S. investors with a track record of U.S. investments, or at least $100,000 from federal, state, or local government agencies.  To be eligible for the extension, founders must continue running their U.S. business, retain at least 5% ownership, and either raise at least $500,000 from U.S. investors, generate $500,000 in annual revenue with 20% year-over-year growth, or prove they've created at least 5 full-time jobs for U.S. workers. 

The rule will also provide the foreign entrepreneur’s dependents (spouses and children under 21) with U.S. parole entry and allow them to apply for unrestricted U.S. work authorization.  The parolee, however, will only be eligible for employment with his or her USCIS-approved startup. 

The International Entrepreneur Rule has been broadened from the proposed rule made in August to accommodate more foreign entrepreneurs.  For more information on the new rule, please feel free to contact us.

H1B Visa Season Starts NOW

Even though we’ve just entered 2017, its time to start focusing on one of the most important dates of the entire year: April 3, 2017 - the date when U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) will begin accepting new H-1B visa petitions. While that may still be several months away, the time to start getting the visa petition ready is NOW

Demand by U.S. employers for H-1B visas on behalf of “highly-skilled” foreign employees reached unprecedented levels last year and is expected to remain high this year. Because it is expected that the 85,000 available H-1B visas will be gone within the first week of April, U.S. businesses should file their H-1B visa petitions on April 3, 2017. Due to prerequisite filing steps which must be completed before the H-1B petition can be submitted to USCIS, employers should begin preparing their petitions now to ensure they are ready to submit on April 3rd.

Employers should assess their upcoming workforce needs and identify whether any foreign national employees will require H-1B visa sponsorship. These individuals may include:

  • New graduating foreign students in the U.S.
  • Overseas individuals seeking to start work in the U.S.
  • Foreign individuals in the U.S. already working under a different nonimmigrant status for a different employer and are seeking to change jobs

Failure to file your H-1B petition on April 3rd may jeopardize your chance at securing an H-1B visa for your employee. After the 2017 H-1B visas are gone, employers will have to wait until April 1, 2018 to file H-1B petitions again, and foreign employees may lose their lawful status and authorization to work. The clock is ticking…don't delay!

If you have any questions about the H-1B visa process, contact me.

 

NEW Immigration Options Coming for Entrepreneurs & Startups

U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) will be announcing today a proposed rule which will allow certain international entrepreneurs to be considered for parole (temporary permission to be in the United States) so that they may start or scale their businesses here in the United States.

The proposed rule would allow the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to grant foreign entrepreneurs of startup entities temporary stay in the U.S. (up to 2 years, with a possible 3 year extension), so long as the foreign national can evidence that he/she will be providing a significant public benefit through the substantial and demonstrated potential for rapid business growth and job creation.  To be eligible, international entrepreneurs of startup enterprises will have to demonstrate:

  • A significant ownership interest in the startup (at least 15 percent) and have an active and central role to its operations;
  • Show their startup was formed in the United States within the past three years; and
  • Has substantial and demonstrated potential for rapid business growth and job creation, as evidenced by: (1) receipt of significant investment of capital (at least $345,000) from certain qualified U.S. investors with established records of successful investments; (2) receipt of significant awards or grants (at least $100,000) from certain federal, state or local government entities; or (3) partially satisfying one or both of the above criteria in addition to other reliable and compelling evidence of the startup entity’s substantial potential for rapid growth and job creation.

The rule will not take affect until after a 45 day public comment period and until it is published in the Federal Register.  Once published, however, this rule will help our economy grow by expanding immigration options for foreign entrepreneurs who meet certain criteria for creating jobs, attracting investment and generating revenue in the U.S.